ParaCheer

The BCA has chosen to adopt the safety guidelines and rules based on the ICU (International Cheer Union)

 

Safety Rules & Criteria

-Designed for teams with athletes with physical and intellectual disabilities-

  1. All ICU general rules and guidelines (Cheerleading & Performance Cheer), and routine requirements apply.
  2. All ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities Unified Teams must be comprised of a minimum 1% to 99% or more ParaCheer Athletes per team.
    Clarification: ParaCheer Athlete qualification is subject to respective BCA general rules and guidelines, as well as National Federation confirmation and/or medical documentation, as requested.
  3. Wheelchair users when basing stunts and pyramids must have all wheels in contact with the performance surface during the skill with an added and appropriate anti-tip attachment for safety.
    Clarification: An appropriate wheelchair anti-tip attachment must be in contact with the chair and the performance surface as an additional point of contact to the performance surface while both wheels of the wheelchair are also in contact with the performance surface.
  4. Wheelchair users when topping stunts and pyramids in the wheelchair (or similar apparatus) must use a seat belt.
  5. All athletes spotting, catching and/or cradling a skill must have mobility through their lower body (with or without use of mobility equipment) to absorb the impact of the skill, as well as with adequate lateral speed to spot, catch and/or cradle the skill.
  6. All athletes spotting, catching and/or cradling a skill must have at minimum 1 arm extended beyond the elbow to adequately assist with the skill.
  7. Release moves and dismounts may be caught by individuals who were not the original base(s) if the main base(s) are not capable of catching and/or cradling the skill.
  8. Mobility devices (i.e. wheelchairs, crutches, etc.) may be used to aid the top person in loading into a stunt and/or pyramid.
    Example: A top person may step upon any portion of a wheelchair, mobile device, and/or upon a base supporting a crutch to load into a skill.
  9. All mobility equipment, prosthesis, and braces are considered part of the athlete unless they are removed, in which case they are considered legal props, until replaced on or returned to the athlete.
  10. Basket tosses are not allowed.

Qualification Guidelines

-Designed for teams with athletes with physical and intellectual disabilities-

For the purpose to assist and encourage ICU’s National Federations to develop ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities opportunities for disabled and non-disabled athletes (e.g. “ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities Unified” divisions and “ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities Traditional” divisions) within our Sport, enclosed (as a guideline only) please find a the IPC’s brief description of the 10 eligible* impairment types (below) also shown on the IPC website https://www.paralympic.org/classification; found under section 2 chapter 3.13 of the IPC Handbook.

Note 1: Due to the newness of the ICU ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities development programme at the grass-roots level, the ICU encourages its National Federations to use the IPC’s excellent brief description of eligible impairment types simply as a guideline – and to encourage participation of all disabled athletes who may or may not meet the impairments listed below. As ICU’s ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities development programme continues to develop, stricter adherence to these policies will be distinctly addressed for specific future competitions.

Note 2: Based on the uniqueness of Cheerleading competition, the ICU additionally includes Hearing Impairment (#11) as a guideline only and also for possible future development of programmes compliant with the ICSD. The ICU again encourages National Federations to be inclusive of athletes of all disabilities, who may or may not meet the impairments listed below, for ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities development purposes.

IPC’s brief description of the 10 eligible* impairment types (as a guideline for the ICU ParaCheer/Adaptive Abilities programme):

Impairment: Explanation

  1. Impaired muscle power: Reduced force generated by muscles or muscle groups, such as muscles of one limb or the lower half of the body, as caused, for example, by spinal cord injuries, spina bifida or polio.
  2. Impaired passive range of movement: Range of movement in one or more joints is reduced permanently, for example due to arthrogryposis. Hypermobility of joints, joint instability, and acute conditions, such as arthritis, are not considered eligible impairments.
  3. Limb deficiency: Total or partial absence of bones or joints as a consequence of trauma (e.g. car accident), illness (e.g. bone cancer) or congenital limb deficiency (e.g. dysmelia).
  4. Leg length difference: Bone shortening in one leg due to congenital deficiency or trauma.
  5. Short stature: Reduced standing height due to abnormal dimensions of bones of upper and lower limbs or trunk, for example due to achondroplasia or growth hormone dysfunction.
  6. Hypertonia: Abnormal increase in muscle tension and a reduced ability of a muscle to stretch, due to a neurological condition, such as cerebral palsy, brain injury or multiple sclerosis.
  7. Ataxia: Lack of co-ordination of muscle movements due to a neurological condition, such as cerebral palsy, brain injury or multiple sclerosis.
  8. Athetosis: Generally characterised by unbalanced, involuntary movements and a difficulty in maintaining a symmetrical posture, due to a neurological condition, such as cerebral palsy, brain injury or multiple sclerosis.
  9. Visual impairment: Vision is impacted by either an impairment of the eye structure, optical nerves or optical pathways, or the visual cortex.
  10. Intellectual Impairment: A limitation in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviour as expressed in conceptual, social and practical adaptive skills, which originates before the age of 18.
  11. Hearing Impairment: Hearing is impacted by either an impairment of the ear structure, illness, or other factors leading to a hearing loss of at least 55 decibels in an athlete’s “better ear”- that is not corrected with the use of hearing aids, cochlear implants and/or similar devices.

Routine Guidelines

  • ParaCheer Teams will perform on a carpet bonded foam spring floor surface.
  • ParaCheer Teams will be evaluated based on the BCA ParaCheer Scoring Guidelines.
  • Time Limit is 2:30 (two-minutes and thirty seconds)
  • Skills can be performed up to Level 2 of the IASF Safety Guidelines.
  • No Tosses Allowed